Editing IPv6 Records

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Currently, most of the Internet uses IPv4 which breaks up IP addresses into 4 sections called octets, with a number from 0-255 in each (eg. 192.168.0.255) which allows for a total of 232 (roughly 4.2 billion) unique addresses. What was once though a ridiculously excessive number turns out now to have been drastically underestimated.

For details on the new Internet protocol that's been designed to rectify this, as well as improve security and routing in general, please see our article on IPv6

Implementation of the protocol has been fragmented, so many users' ISPs or local DNS hosts may not support IPv6. Because of this, it's important that regular DNS support being able to give out basic resolution.

These AAAA records below allow you to map hostnames to addresses on the IPv6 network.

Right now, this domain has no IPv6 hosts defined.

Editipv61.png

Click the Edit.png button to open the editing box

Editipv62.png

Here we'll create a fake host name called fakehost, and assign it to a valid IPv6 address. The IP in question is actually Google's so we don't recommend you try using it yourself.

Editipv63.png

As always, click Next.png and then Confirm.png once you make sure it's all correct.

Allow a few hours for the changes to propagate and when you check that hostname for an AAAA record:

 dig AAAA fakehost.easydnstestdomain1.com
 ;; QUESTION SECTION:
 ;fakehost.easydnstestdomain1.com. IN	AAAA
 ;; ANSWER SECTION:
 fakehost.easydnstestdomain1.com. 10800 IN AAAA	2001:4860:800f::93 

Voila!